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iBiology video on axolotl limb regeneration


28 Jun 2018
Elly Tanaka on iBiology

A recently filmed lecture on axolotls and their role in studying limb regeneration addressed the soaring interest in the work of Elly Tanaka’s lab. The video has now been made available online by iBiology.

Following the publication of the axolotl genome in the journal NATURE last January, the IMP has experienced a high amount of attention – the story was covered by media from around the World, including the ‘New York Times’. Later this week, Germany’s leading political weekly magazine, “DER SPIEGEL”, will publish a story on the groundbreaking work of the Tanaka lab.

Ideal for lay audiences with an in-depth interest in regeneration and work in axolotls, iBiology has now published a recorded two-part lecture by Elly Tanaka. The video was shared via the platform’s own website (https://www.ibiology.org/) and on YouTube (see videos below).

Elly Tanaka on axolotl limb regeneration

 
Part 1: Elly Tanaka explains that axolotl limb regeneration is an excellent system to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of limb regeneration in vertebrates.

 
Part 2: Elly Tanaka expands on her work on signaling in axolotl limb regeneration. She explains how her lab used the technique of expression cloning to identify several factors required to trigger the cell migration and proliferation required for regeneration.

About iBiology

iBiology's mission is to convey the excitement of modern biology and the process by which scientific discoveries are made in the form of open-access free videos. iBiology’s aim is to let viewers meet the leading scientists in biology, so that they can find out how they think about scientific questions and conduct their research, and can also get a sense of their personalities, opinions, and perspectives. iBiology also seeks to support educators who want to incorporate materials that illustrate the process and practice of science into their curriculum. 

https://www.ibiology.org/